Downloading/Editing/Compiling an Open-Source App (Visual Studio, Git)

Downloading/Editing/Compiling an Open-Source App (Visual Studio, Git)

So, I see that my blog is the one place I forgot to announced that I’ve accepted the position of Software Engineer at 2K Sports to work with the NBA 2K team. Oh well. So, yeah, that’s pretty much it. Expect more about that soon. (I’m really excited about it, magnitudes more than this first paragraph shows, but this is not exactly the reason for this post.)

However, not everyone took that too well. There’s a lot of people using the tools I created for NBA 2K12 and 2K13, and they’re disappointed to see me go and stop developing game-specific tools (other tools like NBA Stats Tracker and Hex on Steroids I’ll still work on as a hobby whenever time allows). However, since all my work is open-source, there’s nothing stopping you, any of you, to grab the source code, edit it to your heart’s content, compile and re-release. There’s even a project that I know people were waiting for, namely Roster Workshop, which was to be 2K13’s equivalent of last year’s Roster Merge & Repair, improved and with a whole lot of new features, that never got released with how things turned out. Still, nothing stopping you from releasing it and keeping on working on it. Any of my tools.

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Out of ideas? Not out of things to do (to improve your code)!

Out of ideas? Not out of things to do (to improve your code)!

This will seem like the most obvious tip ever, but I thought I’d get it out there for those that may have forgotten about it in a while. If you’ve ran out of ideas on what to work onĀ  your project next (i.e. you have no new features or improvements in mind), try going through your codebase and find the oldest pieces of it. (Side note: Having your codebase be in something like a Git repository that can tell you when each line of code was committed and thus last edited can be amazingly helpful.) Chances are you’ve grown since then. You’re a better developer. You have more tricks up your sleeve. Maybe you know of a new algorithm, a new library, a new, better way to do things. Maybe you’ve read about security risks you weren’t aware of. There’s almost definitely going to be something there that could use some tidying up, some improvement.

Look for redundancies, variables or parameters that seemed helpful at the time, but now seem obviously unneeded. Look for opportunities to refactor, to optimize, to parallelize. Look for possible security risks, replace unsafe procedures and methods with safer ones. Maybe try doing a whole piece of code from scratch.

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Fix for “Automation Server Can’t Create Object” (Updated)

Updated to include sample .REG file of solution. Read on.

I love foobar2000. I absolutely love it. It’s lightweight, straight-forward, and so customizable it’s ridiculous. I loved it even more when I found out spotifoo (a skin for foobar2000), which although now a couple of years old, does everything I want (including Last.fm scrobbling, play count and love) and still has a very uncluttered and space-effective interface. However, recently, and with no indication as to what caused this change, when I started up foobar, most of the panels of the spotifoo skin were replaced by an “Aw, crashed! :(” message, and I was getting multiple errors about an unexpected script issue. I checked the console, and it was full of “Automation Server Can’t Create Object” errors. I have been trying to find a solution for this for weeks, I even switched to MusicBee for a while; but I HAD to get my foobar2000 back. Finally, I’ve just found the solution, but it’s in no way an elegant one.

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Going from C# to C++ in preparation of …”something”

After a few years of developing only in C# (all my hobby projects, e.g. modding tools, as well as my thesis, were written in C#, targeting .NET 4 and using WPF for the pretty (the what?) UI), I’m “back” to C++. To be brutally honest, I haven’t used C++ much. I did use it for whatever university assignments I had that required it, and I learned some pretty basic and important concepts with it, such as server-client architecture, multi-threading, message passing, parallelism. Only reason I didn’t get into it more was because when I did decide to get in trouble and start developing on a daily basis on projects I loved, I had already discovered C#. C# promised the power of C++, with a minimal amount of the trouble that C++ could cause you. Its power, the level of automation and abstraction the .NET platform offered, and how well tied it was with Visual Studio made it an absolute pleasure of a language to develop in. I could do everything I wanted, I had Visual Studio’s magnificent visual debugger, IntelliSense, documentation, I had LINQ; you could say the world was my oyster. And I created some useful things with it. All my modding tools were put to use by the basketball modding community, and NBA Stats Tracker was even used by a varsity basketball team in the US. I learned a whole fucking lot from using C#. My first big project, the delicateness of code where a single, innocent-looking change can break so many things in the rest of your project, trying to refactor and messing things up, trying to find what went wrong in a stack trace that was 9 calls deep, how to properly design an object-oriented program, what to do when you manage to crash the CLR (yes, that actually happened), so many things that I simply cannot list of the top of my head, really.

But C# is a world of convenience. 50% of what you need to do, it’s there, in the libraries. Memory allocation? Done for you. You declare and allocate everything the same way, not having to worry if something won’t fit in the stack, not having to worry about dangling references, segmentation faults, undefined variables.

Enter C++.

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Becoming a “good programmer”

So, someone from the NLSC forums realized I’m a CS (actually, CE) student, and asked me for tips on how to go around becoming a “good programmer”. Here’s what I had to say, coming from my own experience. Full disclosure, when I began my CE studies, I was already familiar with some programming concepts, since I had been using Visual Basic since grade school, and had started my own project at 2003. But, I still think what I write below could act as some tips even for a person who’s just getting to know programming.

There’s no particular language that will get you to be a good programmer. All the languages you’ve mentioned have one thing in common, they’re object-oriented. Which means, they’re based around classes (objects) and their properties and what you can do to manipulate those objects.

There’s many steps to becoming a good programmer, but the most important one is practice, and exploring programming outside the limits of the assignments that were given to you, when you have the time.

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